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USB-minnen

Ingen enhetsbokstav i Windows XP

My Computor/Manage/Disk Management
Högerklicka på den felande enheten och välj Change driver letters and path.
Ev. behöver man gå in under Device manager/Disk drives och högerklicka på enheten för att koppla till en enhetsbokstav.

Starkt lösenord

Ett starkt lösenord ska vara långt och komplext, men samtidigt lätt att komma ihåg. Det låter onekligen motsägelsefullt. Microsoft rekommenderar att det är minst 14 tecken långt, innehåller en blandning av versaler och gemener, siffror och specialtecken. Det låter som ett recept på något som verkligen kommer att vara svårt att komma ihåg, men så behöver det inte vara. Så här kan du göra:

  1. Börja med en mening som betyder något för dig, så att den är lätt att komma ihåg, gärna en som innehåller och namn och årtal eller datum, så slipper du fundera så mycket på att peta in siffror och versaler: ”Jag besökte Louvren i Paris 1999 och Towern i London 2002”
  1. Ta första bokstaven från varje ord och sista årtal eller datum: JbLiP9oTiL2
  1. Öka längden genom att lägga till några specialtecken, eller byta ut bokstäverna mot snarlika specialtecken så det blir enklare att komma ihåg lösenordet. Till exempel: !J€b/LiP9oTiL2

Nu har vi skapat ett lösenord, som är omöjligt att gissa, inte går att knäcka med hackarordlistor och som är långt nog att motstå så kallade brute force-attacker. Samtidigt bör du kunna komma ihåg det. Du behöver bara hålla reda på ursprungsmeningen, vilka specialtecken du petade in och var, men det ska förstås vara baserat på din egen mening. För den här kan ju alla som läst den här artikeln.

Just hackares användande av ordlistor gör att du aldrig ska använda riktiga ord i dina lösenord, oavsett språk. Det gäller även slang och namn. Med hjälp av ordlistorna blir den typen av lösenord väldigt lätta att knäcka, även om du lägger till några siffror.

Win7 and NAS, security

Suggestion 1

Some Linux based NAS boxes run an older less secure protocol than Win7 allows.
You can dumb down windows..

For pro or above
click the start button and type secpol.msc in the search function.

Browse to “Local Policies” → “Security Options”. Now look for the entry “Network Security: LAN Manager authentication level” and open it. Click on the dropdown menu and select “Send LM & NTLM - use NTLMv2 session security if negotiated”. Apply the settings.

For Home versions
click the start button and type secpol.msc in the search function.

Browse to “Local Policies” → “Security Options”. Now look for the entry “Network Security: LAN Manager authentication level” and open it. Click on the dropdown menu and select “Send LM & NTLM - use NTLMv2 session security if negotiated”. Apply the settings.

In the Advanced sharing settings page of Network and sharing center, you need to have it set as Work/Home profile. Try
Make sure computers are the same workgroup for now (you can change it later)
Enable network discovery
Turn on file and print sharing
Turn off password protected sharing
Turn on Use user accounts and passwords to connect to other computers
1. Launch regedit from Start Search box.
2. Find the following branch.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa

3. Create a DWORD key under Lsa and set:

Name: LmCompatibilityLevel
Value: 1

4. Restart.

For both Pro and above and home vesions

In the Advanced sharing settings page of Network and sharing center, you need to have it set as Work/Home profile. Try
Make sure computers are the same workgroup for now (you can change it later)
Enable network discovery
Turn on file and print sharing
Turn off password protected sharing
Turn on Use user accounts and passwords to connect to other computers

Suggestion 2

Control Panel - Administrative Tools - Local Security Policy

Local Policies - Security Options

Network security: LAN Manager authentication level
Send LM & NTLM responses

Minimum session security for NTLM SSP
Disable Require 128-bit encryption

Using Multiple Credentials in Windows

By dbott | October 8, 2009

Many times, it is necessary to connect to your NAS using different credentials than the ones you are currently using. A good example of this is when multiple users wish to have concurrent drive mappings to their home directory on the NAS when sharing a computer.

A short-coming in Windows will only allow a client to have one set of concurrent credentials for each ‘virtual circuit’. Of course, logging out allows you to clear the circuit and use a different set of credentials to connect to the NAS. So, if User2 comes along to User1‘s computer and maps a drive to the NAS, everything works as it should:

C:\Documents and Settings\user1>net use p: \\NAS1\user2
The password is invalid for \\NAS1\user2.

Enter the user name for 'NAS1': user2
Enter the password for NAS1: *****

The command completed successfully.

However, if User1 comes back to his computer and tries to map drive Q to the NAS using his credentials, the drive mapping fails:

C:\Documents and Settings\user1>net use q: \\NAS1\user1
The password is invalid for \\NAS1\user1.

Enter the user name for 'NAS1': user1
Enter the password for NAS1:
Enter the user name for 'NAS1': user1
Enter the password for NAS1:

System error 1219 has occurred.

Multiple connections to a server or shared resource by the same user, using more than one user name, are not allowed. Disconnect all previous connections to the server or shared resource and try again.

The drive mapping fails because the user is trying to map a drive over the same ‘virtual circuit’. If you logout & login the ‘virtual circuit’ is destroyed and User1 can map his drive.

Here’s the trick: If the virtual circuit names were different, the 2 users could both specify different credentials and each maintain their own drive mapping. Of course, you only have one NAS and don’t want to logout/login every 2 minutes (or buy a NAS for each user), so here’s what you can do:

Connect to the NAS using a different hostname than the first user (you could also use the IP address, but that’s only helpful if you have only 2 users). Most operating systems allow you to create friendly names for computers, rather than having to remember the IP address. There are different name services (WINS & DNS) and they can be managed by a server or at the local computer level (by entering the desired information in the ‘hosts’ or ‘lmhosts’ file).

In my example below, I’ve connected to the hostname of the NAS (aka ‘NetBIOS Name’ in Windows parlance) for User2:

C:\Documents and Settings\user1>net use p: \\NAS1\user2
The password is invalid for \\NAS1\user2.

Enter the user name for 'NAS1': user2
Enter the password for NAS1:
The command completed successfully.

And now for user1, I’ve connected using the IP address of the NAS, rather than the hostname:

C:\Documents and Settings\user1>net use q: \\192.168.1.2\user1
The command completed successfully.

C:\Documents and Settings\user1>

Depending on how many user’s that may be trying to connect in each session, you would need to create a unique hostname for the NAS for each user. This can be accomplished by creating aliases for the NAS in your DNS server, or for smaller networks, in the local [b]hosts[/b] file on each computer.
A Practical Example:

Supposing you had a small 5-user network, with 1 NAS (hostname=NAS1), you could do something similar to the following:

1. Edit the C:\Windows\System32\Drivers\etc\hosts file on each PC to include something similar to:

# Copyright (c) 1993-1999 Microsoft Corp.
#
# This is a sample HOSTS file used by Microsoft TCP/IP for Windows.
#
# This file contains the mappings of IP addresses to host names. Each
# entry should be kept on an individual line. The IP address should
# be placed in the first column followed by the corresponding host name.
# The IP address and the host name should be separated by at least one
# space.
#
# Additionally, comments (such as these) may be inserted on individual
# lines or following the machine name denoted by a '#' symbol.
#
# For example:
#
# 102.54.94.97 rhino.acme.com # source NAS
# 38.25.63.10 x.acme.com # x client host

127.0.0.1 localhost
192.168.1.2 NAS1 # NAS alias for User1
192.168.1.2 NAS2 # NAS alias for User2
192.168.1.2 NAS3 # NAS alias for User3
192.168.1.2 NAS4 # NAS alias for User4
192.168.1.2 NAS5 # NAS alias for User5

2. Next, create a batch file that will delete any existing mapped drives and then re-map the user’s home folders using their assigned NAS aliases:

net use * /delete /yes
net use P: \\NAS1\user1 /user:user1
net use Q: \\NAS2\user2 /user:user2
net use R: \\NAS3\user3 /user:user3
net use S: \\NAS4\user4 /user:user4
net use T: \\NAS5\user5 /user:user5

Note: you will be prompted to enter the password for each user. You could automate the entire process, but it would involve saving the user’s password (in plain text) in the file (generally a bad idea).

net use P: \\NAS1\user1 /user:user1 user1's_secret_password

To clear all connections, run this command:

C:\Documents and Settings\user1>net use * /delete /yes
You have these remote connections:

P: \\NAS1\user1
Q: \\NAS2\user2
R: \\NAS3\user3
S: \\NAS4\user4
T: \\NAS5\user5
Continuing will cancel the connections.

The command completed successfully.

Of course, there are probably much more elegant ways to do this (if you run your own DNS server, you could create a number of aliases for the NAS and you wouldn’t need to update each hosts file). You could also create a VBS script that would prompt the user to enter their credentials and the script would then create the alias in the hosts file and map the drive based on the username supplied (assuming the username is also the name of the share in which they are being connected).

Additional background can be found here:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/938120

Windows 7/Vista slow WLAN

http://home.bott.ca/webserver/?p=226

There are a number of users of Microsoft Vista and Windows 7 that have issues when trying to access their ReadyNAS Duo and NV+ devices over a wireless connection. When Vista was first released, there were wide-spread complaints about Vista’s performance and all sorts of tips and tweaks on how to disable auto-tuning. Since the release of Service Pack 1, most of these problems have disappeared.

Even with Vista SP1, some ReadyNAS owners are finding the read performance to be excruciatingly slow when using Vista over a wireless connection. From my experience, it seems to be a combination of Vista and the type of wireless chipset (which is tied to the driver), as not every laptop running Vista has this issue.

It’s also interesting to note that the same hardware running Windows XP or Linux does not experience performance problems, nor does every computer running Vista. For example, my wife’s Lenovo Thinkpad running Vista with Intel wireless N card does not exhibit this behaviour, but my dad’s Dell running Vista with Broadcom wireless G does. My Dell laptop running XP and wireless G does not exhibit this behaviour.

Under normal circumstances, changing the MTU on the NAS to a lower number should force Vista to auto-adjust it’s MTU, but it does not seem to work as expected and is detailed here: http://www.kitz.co.uk/adsl/vistaMTU.htm

… even though MTU of 1430 is set for best performance on my router, Vista still has the default windows setting of 1500 on both the wireless and ethernet network cards – this is despite the auto tuning feature that is supposed to automatically adjust the MTU figure.

I have found that setting the MTU to 1430 for the wireless card on the Vista laptop to be very effective at resolving the performance issues when reading and writing to the ReadyNAS. This allows the NAS to leave the MTU at it’s default setting of 1500 for optimized performance with other clients.

This work-around is based upon the tutorial provided by the folks at http://www.kitz.co.uk/adsl/vistaMTU.htm and modified for users of the ReadyNAS (as well as to preserve the information in the event this information is removed from their site).

Fixing the Problem:

First, make sure that you’re running SP1.
In Vista, open an administrative command prompt.

Next, we need to find out the name of our wireless connection. At the command prompt type:

netsh interface ipv4 show subinterfaces

In the example above the interface name is Wireless Network Connection and the MTU is currently set to 1500. Make note of the interface name.
At the command prompt type the following command:

netsh interface ipv4 set subinterface "Wireless Network Connection" mtu=1430 store=persistent

At this point, you should be a reboot away from normal expected wireless performance (around 2-3 MB/s for 802.11g connections).
Make sure the MTU on the ReadyNAS is set at it’s default value of 1500. In Frontview, go to Network > Interfaces > MTU and verify that it’s set to 1500.

If this does not work for you, try adjust the MTU in Vista to 1460 and/or 1492.

Pebble display issue

links/problem.txt · Last modified: Y-m-d, H:i by anders_admin